Volume 6, Issue 6, December 2020, Page: 326-331
Associated Factors with Pre-eclampsia Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care in SOS Hospital Mogadishu, Somalia: A Hospital-based Study
Omar Dahir, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Somalia, Mogadishu, Somalia
Samio Mohamud, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Somalia, Mogadishu, Somalia
Ahmed Abdinoor, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Somalia, Mogadishu, Somalia
Gallad Dahir, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, Jamhuriya University of Science and Technology, Mogadishu, Somalia
Hoda Abdinur, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Science, Jamhuriya University of Science and Technology, Mogadishu, Somalia
Received: Oct. 14, 2020;       Accepted: Oct. 28, 2020;       Published: Nov. 4, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.cajph.20200606.12      View  44      Downloads  45
Abstract
Background and objective: Preeclampsia is a condition that affects some pregnant women during the second half of their pregnancy. It is estimated that 3-5% of all pregnancies is affected by preeclampsia and it has become the leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality across the world. The objective of this study was to determine risk factors associated with Pre-eclampsia among pregnant women attending antenatal care in SOS hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted among 80 pregnant women attending antenatal care in SOS hospital. Face to face interview questionnaire was performed from April to June 2020. SPSS version 23, was used for the data analysis. Socio-demographic of respondent, previous history of chronic disease obstetric characteristics were described using the statistics of frequency and Percentage distributions. Results: of the 80 of the diagnosed with preeclampsia, majority of the them were above the age of 30 this represented 33.8% depict that there is a high rate of preeclampsia cases in extreme ages. Divorced women had higher percentage of 61.3% compared to widowed and married women with 33.8% and 5 percent respectively. High blood pressure was high among the women tested with 77.5% of them had the history of hypertension. Majority of the women interviewed 76.3% had no family history of preeclampsia. Conclusion: the prevalence of preeclampsia variation was related by maternal age, maternal education, unemployed women, family problem, and previous history of hypertension and used women more salts during pregnancy. Among the pregnant women, those that were in the first trimester were almost the same as those that were at their third trimester with 42.5% and 38.8% respectively. Only 42.5% of the gestational age of pregnancy were at their first trimester. Regular training of health workers on preeclampsia causes, effects and how to prevent it from becoming a long lasting issue among pregnant women need to be addressed and for further studies are recommended.
Keywords
Preeclampsia, Pregnant Women, Antenatal Care
To cite this article
Omar Dahir, Samio Mohamud, Ahmed Abdinoor, Gallad Dahir, Hoda Abdinur, Associated Factors with Pre-eclampsia Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care in SOS Hospital Mogadishu, Somalia: A Hospital-based Study, Central African Journal of Public Health. Vol. 6, No. 6, 2020, pp. 326-331. doi: 10.11648/j.cajph.20200606.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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